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From newsletter 24:

19 (INCUNABLE). CICERO, Marcus Tullius Tusculanae disputationes. Cum commento. Venice, [Antonius de Strata], December 5, 1492. 29,5 x 21 cm. Vellum-backed boards with title label (20th century). 58 leaves. First blank with some handwritten notes of a slightly later date (citations of Quintillian and Juvenal) and owner's inscription 'Joannes antonius de paula'. Some repairs and humidity stains. Tiny worm holes with loss of a few letters. With one handwritten guide letter, no initials or rubrication. Marginal notes, hands, lines and some inkstains, partly cut short.

€ 3450

* Philosophic disputations in the city of Tusculum. Attractive incunable: text between commentaries in narrower colums. Complete. Pleasant modern binding. Goff C638; BSB C-406.

 

19 (INCUNABLE). SILIUS ITALICUS Punica. Cum commentariis Petri Marsi. Venice, Bonetus Locatellus for Octavianus Scotus, May 18, 1492. 31,5 x 20,5 cm. Flexible vellum, probably from the 17th century. 156 leaves. Watermark cross, snake and ox head. With introductory letter by Marsus to Virginio Orsini and a Life of Silius Italicus. Text with commentary on each page. With some larger woodcut initials and a large woodcut printer?s mark at the end. Second Venetian edition. All edges gilt. With double (old) spine inscription. A bit soiled and worn, title in ballpoint on upper cover. Some text pages browned. Two old inscriptions in brown ink on the first two unprinted leaves, one crossed out, the other saying: 'Vi sono monete di Smirne, che ricordano questo poeto consolare'.

€ 5450

* Punica, the largest epic poem that survived from Roman antiquity, was written in dactylic hexameters by poet and politician Tiberius Catius Asconius Silius Italicus (about 28-103 AD). In seventeen Books containing more than twelve thousand verse the Second Punic War is painted, from the moment Hannibal Barcas laid siege to Saguntum in 219 BC to the victory of Scipio the Younger at Zama (202 BC). The epos contains many classical heroic accounts of large battles, but also praise for Silius' contemporary employers, the emperors Vespasian and Domitian. Silius admired Cicero and Vergil so much that he acquired Cicero's property at Tusculum and set Vergil's birthday above his own. The inscription on the inside upper cover points to a brass coin occasioned by Silius when he was proconsul in Asia (minted in 77-79) honoring Titus and Domitian as caesars. Petrus Marsus (Pietro Marso, 1442-1512) was a student and close friend of Pomponius Laetus, who also wrote a commentary on Silius Italicus. A master work of austere Venetian book art, printed in firm text blocks from an attractive antiqua, awash in a sea of commentary in a harmonic smaller type. Simple title page stating only 'Syllius Italicus. Cum com-/ mentariis Petri Marsi' Goff S-508. BSB S-386..

 

From newsletter 23:

antiquariaat Fokas Holthuis - PAULBOOKS

(Fokas Holthuis & Paul Snijders)
Postbus 18604, 2502 EP Den Haag

The Netherlands
telephone +3170-346 6020 - cellphone +316-4190 9323
email
paulsn@ziggo.nl

www.paulbooks.nl - Dutch section www.fokas.nl

Newsletter 23 = Catalog 64 (October, 2013)

Cycling Sybils

Illustration from Nr. 70 of this list

Some subjects

Bindings 8-11

John Buckland Wright 13-29

Incunables 41-43

Onanismus 57-60

Minibooks 70-71

Salvage 74

Painting 75

Vordemberge-Gildewart 79-80

Werkman 81-92

Transport 4, 72, 97

CBO editions 62, 77, 78

41 (INCUNABLE). SENECA, Lucius Annaeus Opera philosophica. Epistolae. [Venice, Johannes & Gregorius de Gregoriis, de Forlivio, about 1492]. Folio (31,8 x 21,8 cm). 18th century vellum with seven ribs. 237 ff (of 238, lacking only the final blank C10). 60 lines plus head line. Roman type. Capital spaces with guide letters. Binding a bit worn at lower corners, spine soiled and with an old ticket. 18th century bookplate (Joseph Mazarin?). Marginal notes (some trimmed) in a neat cursive contemporary hand, perfectly legible. A bit soiled and some stains. Tiny wormhole in margin starting from leaf cii to the end. A few restorations in margins. Some insignificant pinpoint holes in the text. In all a good copy.

€ 5450

* This attractive incunable contains the philosophical works and letters of Seneca, including his correspondence with Saint Paul (which is in fact a forgery from the 4th century), and also some works of the philosopher's father Seneca the Elder, in the Middle Ages thought to be the son's work. No colophon was printed in this book, the explicit ends with a quire register. Contemporary handwritten title on first blank with the Epitaph of Seneca ('Cura, labor, meritum') as a motto. With some misprints in the pagination and elsewhere (e.g. 'Epitsolarum' instead of 'Epistolarum' on leaf II). BMC, V, 595; Goff S-372, BSB-Ink S-269 (the copy that was used for reproduction has some slight differences in the typesetting). 59 copies in the various libraries (but not in the Dutch).

benediction

42 (INCUNABLE). MARCHESINUS, Johannes Mamotrectus super bibliam. Venice, Simon Bevilaqua, 12 July 1492. 8vo (16,2 x 12,2 cm.) Old vellum with written spine title ('Vocabularius Sacrç Script:'). 273 leaves. Printed in two columns in a gothic type. 36 lines. First text page partly printed in RED. Three small woodcut capitals, initial spaces with guide letters and many three-line capitals of a rather different gothic type. Binding stained and soiled, a small piece of the lower outer corner has been torn off. Title page (with just the word 'Mamotrectus') is missing. Pastedowns soiled and damaged. First blank has a handwritten dedication saying something like 'A Monasterij S.te Vittorie/ ad … Vittorii de Portis'. At the last page a drawing of a bowl and a flower vase accompanies the name of a former owner ('Questo libro … thoma…'). Two pages loosening, some soiling and stains at the beginning and end. A few bookworm trails in the margins. In the last three leaves, some letters are missing because of bookworm damage. Several old inscriptions, especially in the vocabulary at the beginning. In two places, the book was strengthened with a narrow strip of vellum from an old manuscript. At the end, part of a benediction leaflet was used to fasten the book block to its binding. Three more identical leaflets plus four strips of a woodcut decoration were used to fill up the binding.

€ 3750

* This is the 21st of the 23 incunable editions of this text, usually called 'Mammotrectus super bibliam', however, in this book consistently spelled with one M: Mamotrectus, without 'super Bibliam'. In the colophon another version of the title is used: Mamotrectus tam bibliae quam aliorum plurimorum librorum. The meaning of this curious title is 'nourisher on the Bible', strongly suggesting 'the Bible's Breast Milk'. It is a handbook explaining words and notions of the Bible and other important texts, such as the letters of Saint Jerome to Paulinus and Desiderius, but also about clothes of priests, Latin accents and other practical subjects. The Mammotrectus would be useful if you were preparing a sermon or some other priestly act. After 1500, its popularity waned and it was criticized and ridiculed by Erasmus and Rabelais. The book starts with an extensive vocabulary of Latin words and their location in the Bible. The main part is the handbook. It ends with an index after the colophon.

This copy is a well-used practical book with several assets, such as the first text page printed in red and black, and its riddles to solve: the inscriptions at the beginning and the end could supply more information about former owners. The four identical benediction leaflets, used for the binding, probably date from the 17th century. They have been printed on one side only in a cursive Garamond, and contain a ritual benediction starting "I.N.R.I. Qui verbum caro factum est".

Although soiled and a bit damaged, it is an unpolished, authentic incunable that doesn't give itself away at first glance. References: Goff M252; BMC V 517; BSB Ink M-167; GW M20814.

human acorns

43 (INCUNABLE). OCHSENBRUNNER, Thomas Priscorum heroum stemmata. Rome, Johann Besicken & Sigismundus Mayer, February 18, 1494. No wrappers, but sewn with modern endpapers. Part of early 19th century wrapper preserved. (54) p. Richly illustrated with one full-page woodcut, 75 woodcuts in the text (from 16 blocks), two pages with illustrated borders and several nice woodcut initials. Roman type. First edition. Last blank is missing. Cut short in places. Some stamps from a 19th century library ('Königl. Acad.d. Künste zu Berlin'). First (blank) page slightly soiled and with a written number. Full-page woodcut has some light amateur coloring. Creased, especially last 8 or 10 leaves. Last leaf soiled, rather creased and bumped, but without tears. First and last leaf discreetly and professionally strengthened.

€ 6250

* Charmingly printed early history of Rome ('The Pedigrees of the Ancient Heroes') intended for pilgrims and other visitors. After a preface and sketch of Rome's mythical beginnings with Janus, Romulus is introduced, followed by later kings, heroes and emperors, until the year 412. In the impressive full-page woodcut the Capitoline oak is growing from sleeping Romulus, surrounded by many feats of Roman history. For the 71 smaller illustrations depicting the heroes as human acorns framed by elegantly rendered oak branches, only 12 different blocks have been used, but they are really pleasing. Some of the larger illustrations have been signed IH-HS. According to G.K. Nagler, Monogrammisten III, 1127, this signature might be connected with Jacob von Strassburg. The book ends with a poem by Andreas Prenestinus ('Andrew of Palestrina'). A delightfully illustrated little history book. References: Goff O7; BMC IV 139; BSB O-1; GW M27428.

From newsletter 22:

14. (INCUNABLE). OCHSENBRUNNER, Thomas Priscorum heroum stemmata. Rome, Johann Besicken & Sigismundus Mayer, February 18, 1494. No wrappers, but sewn with modern endpapers. Part of early 19th century wrapper preserved. (54) p. Richly illustrated with one full-page woodcut, 75 woodcuts in the text (from 16 blocks), two pages with illustrated borders and several nice woodcut initials. Roman type. First edition. Last blank missing. Cut short in places. Some stamps from a 19th century library ('Königl. Acad.d. Künste zu Berlin'). First (blank) page slightly soiled and with a written number. Full-page woodcut has some light amateur coloring. Creased, especially last 8 or 10 leaves. Last leaf soiled, rather creased and bumped, but without tears. First and last leaf discreetly and professionally strengthened.

€ 6250

* Attractively printed early history of Rome ('The Pedigrees of the Ancient Heroes') intended for pilgrims and other visitors. After a preface and sketch of Rome's mythical beginnings with Janus, Romulus is introduced, followed by later kings, heroes and emperors, until the year 412. In the impressive full-page woodcut the Capitoline oak is growing from a sleeping Romulus, surrounded by many feats of Roman history. For the 71 smaller illustrations depicting the heroes as human acorns framed by elegantly rendered oak branches, only 12 different blocks have been used, but they are really charming. Some of the larger illustrations have been signed IH-HS. According to G.K. Nagler, Monogrammisten III, 1127, this signature might be connected with Jacob von Strassburg. A delightfully illustrated little history book. References: Goff O7; BMC IV 139; BSB O-1; GW M27428.

From newsletter 21:

38.  VILLON, François Oeuvres de François Villon. Le lais, Le testament et ses ballades. (Den Haag, Kunera Pers, 1926). Original limp vellum with gilt spine title. (4), 142 p. Set by hand and printed with the Disteltype by J.F. van Royen in blue, red and black in 110 copies. 

€ 750

* One of the great prewar privately printed editions of the Netherlands. The typography was inspired by the incunables; the initials were cut in boxwood by Van Royen himself, a remarkable feat. Van Royen 1964, 15.

From newsletter 18:

1. (INCUNABLE). SENECA, Lucius Annaeus Opera philosophica. Epistolae. [Venice, Johannes & Gregorius de Gregoriis, de Forlivio, about 1492]. Folio (31,8 x 21,8 cm). 18th century vellum with 7 ribs. 237 ff (of 238, lacking final blank C10). 60 lines plus head line. Roman type. Capital spaces with guide letters. Binding a bit worn at lower corners, spine soiled and with old ticket. 18th century bookplate (Joseph Mazarin?). Marginal notes (some trimmed) in a neat cursive contemporary hand, perfectly legible. A bit soiled and some stains. Tiny wormhole in margin starting from page cii to the end. A few restorations in margins. Some insignificant pinpoint holes in the text. In all a good copy.

€ 6250

* This attractive INCUNABLE contains the philosophical works and the letters of Seneca, including his correspondence with Saint Paul (in fact a forgery from the 4th century), and also some works of the philosopher's father Seneca the Elder, that in the Middle Ages were thought to be the son's work). No real colophon was printed in this book, just an explicit with quire register. Contemporary handwritten title on first blank with the Epitaph of Seneca ('Cura, labor, meritum...') as a motto. With some misprints in the pagination and elsewhere (e.g. 'Epitsolarum' instead of 'Epistolarum' on leaf II). BMC, V, 595; Goff S-372, BSB-Ink S-269 (the copy that was used for reproduction has some slight differences in the typesetting). 59 copies in the various libraries. Not in the Dutch libraries. Feel free to ask for photos.